People in flight – Photography by Denisa Tarzaka

    The following pictures aren’t made up by some Photoshop artist. These are the works of French photographer Denisa Tarzaka, who relies on professional dancers and his precise timing to produce the effect of zero gravity.
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The Monastery of Ten Thousand Buddhas

    High above a lush hillside in the New Territories town of Sha Tin, Hong Kong is the Monastery of Ten Thousand Buddhas. It is not an actual monastery as there are no resident monks - instead, it is crowed with more than 13,000 statues of Buddhas of all shapes and sizes. To reach the monastery one must first climb over 400 steps up the hillside, the path lined with life-size statues of Buddhas.
    “The entire path upwards was lined with Buddha statues, statues different from any Buddha I'd seen at a previous temple,” writes blogger Andy Carvin. “In fact, each statue was probably unique. There were thin Buddhas, chubby Buddhas, bald Buddhas, hairy Buddhas, Buddhas with walking sticks, Buddhas with dogs and dragons and frogs, macho Buddhas, androgynous Buddhas.”
    Once inside the monastery, you are accosted by more statues – Buddhas in the garden, Buddhas in the pavilion, Buddhas in the tower. The walls inside the temple is lined with thousands upon thousands of miniature Buddhas.
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    The Ten Thousand Buddhas Monastery was founded in 1951 by Yuet Kai, a monk who preached Buddhism in a local monastery. Construction of the monastery began in 1949. Despite his old age, Yuet Kai carried the buildings materials personally from the foot of the mountain together with his disciples to build the monastery. It took eight years to complete all the buildings and another ten years to finish the 12,800 Buddha statues. Today, his preserved body is presented in the main hall of the monastery in a glass case, often the main attraction of the temple.
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    Photos by Polina Delia

‘Astronaut Suicides’ by Neil DaCosta

    Astronaut Suicides is a humorous photo series by Neil Dacosta where he staged actors, donning spacesuits, attempting suicides following the end of the U.S. space program.
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Long Exposure Photos of Night-time Air Attacks

    The ever increasing power and precision of modern artillery in recent years have attracted a great deal of attention to night attacks. It’s obvious that the advances in science and weapons technology makes it desirable to deliver attacks under the cover of darkness.
    Modern war is mostly air raids, missile attacks and bombings that can be carried out even at night. Using sophisticated and cutting-edge, missile guidance systems and other state-of-the-art technology one can strike the enemy at precise targets causing maximum damage while incurring minimum loss to self. Night attacks also have an adverse psychological effect on the enemy.
    Although there can be no justification for war, the following image gallery captures the fascinating beauty (if I may be allowed to use the word in this context) of war.
    Also see a somewhat similar Long Exposure Shots of Airline Takeoffs and Landings
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    [via Pesochinsky]

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